Gypsy Davey

The fiddle wailing out its melancholy tune, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "It was late last night, when the lord came home, asking about his lady."

His eyes flickering around the room, regarding each table in turn, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "And the only answer he received, was 'she's gone with the gypsy Davey, she's gone with the gypsy Davey.'"

Swaying slightly as he continues sawing on the fiddle, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Go saddle for me my good gray kank, And my finest leather saddle,"

His eyes amused as he continues to play, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Point out to me their wagon tracks, and after them I'll travel, after them I'll travel."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Well, he had not rode to the midnight moon, when he saw their campfire gleaming,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "And he heard the notes of the big guitar, and the voice of the gypsy singing, singing the song of the gypsy Davey."

His voice imploring, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Take off, take off your lacey gloves, and your boots of carru leather,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Give to me your lily white hands, and we'll go back home together, oh, we'll ride back home again."

Flicking his hair back with a slight, definite shake of his head, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "No, I won't take off my lacey gloves, nor my boots of carru leather,"

The fiddle's music lilting through the room, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "I'll go my way from day to day, and sing with the gypsy Davey, yes, I'll go with the gypsy Davey."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Have you forsaken your house and home, have you forsaken your baby?"

 crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Have you forsaken your husband dear, to go with the gypsy Davey, to sing with the gypsy Davey?"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Yes, I've forsaken my house and home, to go with the gypsy Davey ,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "And I've forsaken my husband dear, but not my blue eyed baby, oh my pretty little blue-eyed baby."

With a last pull at the strings, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man brings the song to an end.

A Dreamer's Consolation

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man takes up his fiddle, beginning a light, wistful melody.

His dark eyes gleaming as he sends a languishing look at a waitress, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "I see her in dreams, she trips to me lightly,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "With love on her lips she whispers my name."

As the waitress flicks him a slight scowl, turning to take an order, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Her eyes look in mine, so fondly so brightly,"

A slight, reminiscent smile tugging his lips upward, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "I wake and 'tis then no longer the same."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Her glance then is chilly, her step seems to shun me,"

Still watching the waitress as she moves from table to table, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "The lips that have smiled wear the curl of disdain;"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Oh! Megan's fair child, my love hath undone me,"

With a faint sigh as the waitress continues to ignore him, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "But yet in my dreams I'll see you again. "

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Oh, Megan's fair child, in sleep you are with me,"

Pitching his voice to carry through the room, the fiddle's sweet croon accompanying him, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Wherever we walk, you go by my side;"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "You hear with delight the words I am saying,"

Smiling darkly as the waitress flicks a look at him over her shoulder before moving to carry off a tray, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "I read your young heart, I read it with pride."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "But ah, when awake if I vow I adore you,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Your look ever tells me I woo you in vain;"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man winks for a moment towards another woman where she sits at her table.

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "I'll trouble you not, no more plead before you;"

Ending the song with a slow, wistful trail of notes, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Since I know in my dreams, you'll love me again."



Kiss Me Goodnight, Sergeant Major
The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man grins, a rollicking tune rippling out across the room as a few of the rowdier drinkers cheer and stamp their feet.

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Runner Jones came in one night,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Full of cheer and very bright."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "He'd been out all day upon the spree."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "He bumped into Sergeant Smeck,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Put his arms around his neck"

Motioning with a sweeping gesture towards the crowd, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "And in his ear he whispered tenderly:"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man grins widely as the entire room begins to join in on the chorus.

Resuming the quick and lively tune, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Kiss me good-night, Sergeant-Major,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Tuck me in my little wooden bed."

With a wink and a bat of his eyes, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "We all love you, Sergeant-Major,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "When we hear your bawling, "It's Nekrete.""

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Don't forget to wake me in the morning,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "And bring me round a nice hot cup of tea"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Kiss me good-night, Sergeant-Major,"

Drawing the last few word out slowly, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Sergeant-Major, be a mother to me."


I kept the emotes in on this one, because I like the fact that the small, hazel-eyed woman
is a virtual NPC:

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man takes up a seat on the edge of the 
stage as a small hazel-eyed woman hops up beside him, pulling a hide drum onto her lap.

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man glances over at the small, hazel-eyed 
woman, picking up his fiddle and joining in, playing quick accompaniment to her steady rhythm.

Fiddle caterwauling merrily as he plays, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Well, if you love me baby this is what you've got to do,"

The song echoing through the noisy room, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "You got to let the world know that you love me too"

The small, hazel-eyed woman shoots a grin over at the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man, 
her hands flying as they beat out a steady rhythm on her hide drum.

Eyes twinkling, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "If I'm crazy, you'll be crazy too,"
     
Continuing to play, the fiddle's music driven by the drum's steady beat, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "We gonna have a crazy time just playing crazy music for you,"

Her hands steadily thumping out a fast and joyous rhythm, the small, hazel-eyed 
woman winks out at the crowd from her position on the stage beside the crooked-shouldered, 
dark-haired man.

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "We gonna have a crazy time, we gonna jump for joy,"

Slyly grinning sidelong at the small, hazel-eyed woman, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "You be my crazy girl and I'll be your crazy boy,"

As the small, hazel-eyed woman throws back her head and laughs, never faltering in her rhythm, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "If I'm crazy, you'll be crazy too,"

Tapping his foot, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "We gonna have a crazy time just playing crazy music for you."

Grinning out at the crowd over his fiddle, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Crazy, crazy, crazy Crazy, crazy, crazy"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "We gonna have a crazy time just playing crazy music for you,"

Together, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man and the small, hazel-eyed woman fill the large room with the lively, joyous song.

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "I'll play a crazy fiddle and I'll get a crazy sound,"
     
With a lascivious wink, pretending to let his tongue loll from his mouth as he glances over at the small, hazel-eyed woman, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "I'm gonna play it standing up and I'll play it laying down,"

The small, hazel-eyed woman adding her voice to his, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "If I'm crazy, you'll be crazy too,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "We gonna have a crazy time just playing crazy music for you."

Grinning widely as she tucks her hide drum under an arm, the small, hazel-eyed woman takes a bow and hops down from the stage, winking at the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man.

A Soldier's Song
With a quiet grin, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man asks, in sirihish:
     "Now sometimes I hear this 'un called a soldier's song, but I gotta say, 
seems like a gypsy-ish sorta theme to me.  Ya know?"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man takes up his fiddle, sending a rousing, 
rollicking tune out into the room to compete with the hubbub of noise within the Wheel.

His dark eyes flashing as he plays, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "And who are you, me pretty fair maid, and who are you, me honey?"

Sending a laughing look at a woman as she pauses in her conversation and winks up at 
him, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "And who are you, me pretty fair maid, and who are you, me honey?"

Bow scraping along the fiddle strings as a few patrons tap their feet to the beat, 
the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "She answered me quite modestly, 'I am me mother's darling.'"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "With me too-ry-ay Fol-de-diddle-day Di-re fol-de-diddle Dai-rie oh."

The fiddle's merry music laughing along with the amusement in his voice, the 
crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "And will you come to me mother's house, when Krath is shining clearly?"

Repeating the line with a meaningful wink, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man 
sings, in sirihish:
     "And will you come to me mother's house, when Krath is shining clearly?"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "I'll open the door and I'll let you in, and not a one would hear us."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man's fiddle keeps up the rollicking song.

Over the noise of the bustling crowd, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, 
in sirihish:
     "So I went to her house in the middle of the night, when the moons were shining clearly,"

Nodding significantly, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "So I went to her house in the middle of the night, when the moons were shining clearly,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "She opened the door and she let me in, and not a one did hear us."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "With me too-ry-ay Fol-de-diddle-day Di-re fol-de-diddle Dai-rie oh."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "She took my kank by the bridle and the bit, and she led him to the stable."

Nodding signicantly, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "She took my kank by the bridle and the bit, and she led him to the stable ."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Saying 'There's plenty of feed for a soldier's kank, to eat it if he's able.'"

Fiddle wailing as he sings, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "With me too-ry-ay Fol-de-diddle-day Di-re fol-de-diddle Dai-rie oh."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Then she took me by the lily-white hand, and she led me to the table...oh, 
she took me by the lily-white hand, and she led me to the table,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Saying 'There's plenty of wine for a soldier boy, to drink it if you're able.'"

With an appreciative grin, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "With me too-ry-ay Fol-de-diddle-day Di-re fol-de-diddle Dai-rie oh. "

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Then I got up and made the bed and I made it nice and easy...oh, I got up and 
made the bed and I made it nice and easy,"

With a lustful grin and wink, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Then I got up and laid her down, saying 'Lassie, are you able?' "

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "With me too-ry-ay Fol-de-diddle-day Di-re fol-de-diddle Dai-rie oh. "

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "And there we lay till the break of day, and not a one did hear us...oh, there 
we lay till the break of day, and not a one did hear us,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Then I arose and put on my clothes, saying 'Lassie, I must leave you.'"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "With me too-ry-ay Fol-de-diddle-day Di-re fol-de-diddle Dai-rie oh."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "And when will you return again, and when will we be married? And when will you 
return again, and when will we be married?"

Shaking his head definitely, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
pulse crooked
     "When broken shells make silver bells, we might well get married."

Drawing out the last few notes of the song, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, 
in sirihish:
     "Ohhhhh, with me too-ry-ay Fol-de-diddle-day Di-re fol-de-diddle Dai-rie oh."

Ol' Dwarf Olin
The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Ol' dwarf Olinn was a gentleman born, he lived at a time when no clothes they were worn,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "But as fashion went out, of course Olinn walked in,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "'Whoo, I'll lead the fashions,' says ol' dwarf Olinn."

Smiling over at a disgruntled looking dwarf, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man 
sings, in sirihish:
     "Ol' dwarf Olinn had no breeches to wear, so he got him an escru hide 
make him a pair,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "With the fleshy side out and the woolly side in,"

Wiggling his eyebrows, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "'Whoo, they're pleasant and cool.' says ol' dwarf Olinn."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Ol' dwarf Olinn had no shirt to his back, so he went to his neighbor's and borrowed a sack,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Then he puckered the meal bag up under his chin"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "'Whoo, they'll take them for ruffles,' says ol' dwarf Olinn."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Ol' dwarf Olinn had no hat to his head, he thought that the pot would do him instead,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Then he murdered a snake for the sake of its skin,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "'Whoo, 'twill pass for a feather.' says ol' dwarf Olinn."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Ol' dwarf Olinn had no stockings to wear, so he bought him a 
rat's skin to make him a pair,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "He then drew them on and they fitted his shin,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "'Whoo, they're elegant wear,' says says ol' dwarf Olinn."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Ol' dwarf Olinn had no shoes to his toes, he hopped on two scrab 
shells to serve him for those,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Then he split up two fine rocks that matched just like twins,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "'Whoo, they'll shine out like buckles,' says ol' dwarf Olinn."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Ol' dwarf Olinn to his house had no door, he'd the sky for a roof 
and the sand for a floor,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "He'd a way to jump out and a way to dig in,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "'Whoo, it's very convenient,' says ol' dwarf Olinn."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man bows with a flourish and a quick wink to the crowd.



Spice Smokes, Whiskey and Wild Wild Women
Pausing to admire a dark-haired waitress as she saunters by with a sway to 
her hips, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man asks, in sirihish:
     "Oh, we all know this song.  Don't we, boys?"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man grins and takes up his fiddle, 
sending the bow across the strings.

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Spice smokes, whiskey and wild wild women,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "They'll drive you crazy, they'll drive you insane;"

Shaking his head with a wry smile, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man 
sings, in sirihish:
     "Spice smokes, whiskey and wild wild women, they'll drive you crazy, 
they'll drive you insane;"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Once I was happy and had a good wife,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "I had enough sid to last me for life"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Then I met with a gal and we went on a spree..."

Winking towards the crowd, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man asks, 
in sirihish:
     "Musta been a Kurac gal, yeah?"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "She taught me smokin' and drinkin' whiskee."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Spice smokes, whiskey and wild wild women, they'll drive you crazy, they'll drive you insane;"

Under his breath, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man says, in sirihish:
     "Oh, yeah, they sure will."

Rolling his eyes, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Spice smokes, whiskey and wild wild women, they'll drive you crazy, 
they'll drive you insane."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Spice smokes are a blight on the whole human race,"

Looking around at the room, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man says, 
in sirihish:
     "Which would include at least a couple a'us."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "A man looks the dilo with one in his face;"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Take warning dear friend, take warning dear brother,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "A fire's on one end, a fool's on the t'other."

Picking up the chorus again, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, 
in sirihish:
     "Spice smokes, whiskey and wild wild women, they'll drive you crazy, 
they'll drive you insane;"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Spice smokes, whiskey and wild wild women, they'll drive you crazy, 
they'll drive you insane."

As the waitress saunters past again, the crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man 
says, in sirihish:
     "Darlin', what would you be doing after the show?  I got some zharal with 
your name allll over it, I think."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man winks towards the crowd, still playing.

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "And now good people, I'm broken with faith,"

With a solemn nod belied by the laughter in his eyes, the crooked-shouldered, 
dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "The lines on my face make a well written page."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "I'm weavin' this story -- how sadly but true,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "On women and whiskey and what they can do."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Spice smokes, whiskey and wild wild women, they'll drive you crazy, 
they'll drive you insane;"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Spice smokes, whiskey and wild wild women, they'll drive you crazy, 
they'll drive you insane."

Shaking his head sorrowfully as a wry grin plays over his face, the 
crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Write on the stone at the head of my grave,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "For women and whiskey here lies a poor slave."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "Take warnin' poor stranger, take warnin' dear friend,"

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man sings, in sirihish:
     "In wide clear letters this tale of my end."

The crooked-shouldered, dark-haired man grins as he ends the song, producing a 
rolled smoke from behind his ear and looking around in search of a light.

The Diplomacy of Swords
Glancing around the inn, a grey-eyed bard says, in sirihish:
     "This song is for you swordfighters, a protest against those sweet 
talking poets."

A grey-eyed bard dips his head a bit, smiling, and sweeps a hand across his 
mandolin strings.

Plucking out the beginnings of a lively tune, a grey-eyed bard sings, in 
sirihish:
     "Call the wind gentle, or call the wind mild,"

With a grim little smile, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
pulse bard
     "Call it whatever; it will always be wild."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Call danger safety, call foe best of friend,"

Continuing the melody's lively beat, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Rely on your words, and you'll come to bad end."

Beginning another verse, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Trust only in action, and never in words,"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "For sword thrust and dagger are louder heard."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "And when peril threatens, or even attacks,"

Winking slightly at a group of grinning men, a grey-eyed bard sings, in 
sirihish:
     "You'll be defenseless with just songs at your back."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Blood calls to blood, and knife calls to knife,"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "And the speaking of either means loss of life,"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "No matter what you name it, a fight is a fight,"

Letting the song draw to a close, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "And soft words are useless 'gainst a blade in the night."

His face touched with a grim smile, a grey-eyed bard hops down off the stage.


And She Always Answered No
A grey-eyed bard smiles and winks at a passing barmaid, fingers deftly 
picking out a lilting melody.

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Yonder stands a pretty fair maiden, with her voice so sweet and low,"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "I'll go court her for her beauty, till she answers yes or no."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Yes or no, yes or no, till she answers yes or no."

As the barmaid smiles up at him, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Madam, I have come a-courting, it's your favor I do deign,"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "If you'll kindly answers pay me, then perhaps I'll come again."

A grey-eyed bard's fingers dance across the strings, the lively lilt 
filling the inn with music.

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Huh-uh, no, no, sir, no', and she always answered 'no'."
His voice dropping lower, coaxing, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Madam, I have sid and silver, Madam, I have a house and land."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Madam, I have three fine wagons, all will be at your command."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Huh-uh, no, no, sir, no', and she always answered 'no'."

His voice's pitch rising a little, mimicking a young girl's voice, a 
grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "I don't want any of your sid and silver, I don't want your house and land."
     
A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "I don't want your three fine wagons.  All I want is a handsome man."

His voice dropping back to its normal pitch as he sings the chorus, 
a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Huh-uh, no, no, sir, no', and she always answered 'no'."

Miming sorrow while somehow still managing to blow the barmaid a kiss, a 
grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Oh my darling, how I love you, it breaks my heart you treat me so."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Guess I'll go and marry above you; kiss me once before I go."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Huh-uh, no, no, sir, no', and she always answered 'no'."

A grey-eyed bard laughs quietly to himself, his foot tapping out an 
accompanying rhythm as he plays.

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Tell me once, and tell me truly, tell me why you scorn me so,"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Tell me why, when asked a question, you will always answer no."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Huh-uh, no, no, sir, no', and she always answered 'no'."

His voice once again taking on the maiden's falsetto, a grey-eyed 
bard sings, in sirihish:
     "My father was a fine brave hunter, and before he went away,"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "He told me I must answer that to everything that you might say."

Nodding to himself, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Huh-uh, no, no, sir, no', and she always answered 'no'."

His voice normal, his eyes gleaming with a sly, rascally look, a 
grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "If while walking in the garden, plucking flowers all red and blue."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Tell me, would you be offended, if I walked and talked with you?"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Huh-uh, no, no, sir, no', and she always answered 'no'.""

Pursing his lips and considering this for a moment before continuing, a 
grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "If while walking in the garden, I should ask you to be mine, "

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "If I tell you that I love you, would you then my heart decline?"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Huh-uh, no, no, sir, no', and she always answered 'no'."

With a final triumphant strum, a grey-eyed bard winks at the cheering crowd 
and bows smoothly, sparing the blushing barmaid one last wink.


Tors and Conversation
A grey-eyed bard's fingers fly over his mandolin, plucking out a 
quick jig, as several tavern occupants begin to dance.

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Once there was a Torish sort of Lord, sing hey nonny, hey nonny, hey nonny ho."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Whatever chanced, he answered with his sword, singing hey nonny, hey nonny, hey nonny ho."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "He thought the baker gave him lip, sing hey nonny, hey nonny, hey nonny, ho,"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "So he split her from her neck to her hip, singing hey nonny, hey nonny, hey nonny ho."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "He asked his servants why he got no bread, sing hey nonny, hey nonny, hey nonny ho,"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "They answered him, 'My Lord, the baker's dead.', sing hey nonny, hey nonny, hey nonny ho."

A grey-eyed bard winks at a pair of dancers as they whirl past, continuing his quick and lively beat.

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "He thought the vinter sassed him back, sing hey nonny, hey nonny, hey nonny ho,"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "So he smacked him with the flat till his head was cracked, sing hey nonny hey nonny hey nonny ho."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "He asked his servants why he got no wine, sing hey nonny, hey nonny, hey nonny ho,"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "They answered him, "Lord, the vintner's not feeling so fine,' sing hey nonny, hey nonny, hey nonny ho."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "He thought his woman gave him a frown, sing hey nonny, hey nonny, hey nonny ho."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "So he drew his sword and cut her down, singing hey nonny, hey nonny, hey nonny ho."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "He asked his servants why he got no ..."

A grey-eyed bard breaks off in a brief coughing fit.

Continuing, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "hey nonny hey nonny hey nonny ho,"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "They answered, "Lord, you better go out and hunt," hey nonny hey nonny hey nonny ho."

A grey-eyed bard grins and winks.

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Oh once there was a Torish Lord, singing hey nonny, hey nonny, hey nonny ho"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Did all his talking with his big bone sword,"

Drawing each word out at length as the song comes to its end, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "singing hey nonny hey nonny hey nonny ho!"



Red Roses
His mellow voice mingling with the sweet sound of the mandolin strings, 
a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Deep within the desert, where the wind blows dry and hot,"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Lies the fragile rosebush, set about with thorns."

Glaring around himself with mock ferocity, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "The way is guarded by so many perils, yet I fear them not,"

Voice softening as he affixes a sappy smile to his face, a grey-eyed 
bard sings, in sirihish:
     "For my lady has commanded roses, ere another morn.  Roses for 
my pretty lady, ere she sees another morn."

Growling and scowling ferociously, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "I fought my way past mantis, I fought my way past gith,"

Pretending to mop his brow, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "I thirsted and I sweated, before I saw my rose."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Set down my sword to pluck it from its thorny niche,"

Miming astonishment and terror, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "When all around me there rose bandits, at least a dozen foes.  
All around me, there were bandits, and at least a dozen foes."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "I would have thrown down my armor, or even yet my sword,"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "But what they asked for they would pay for in blows."

Voice almost cracking with sorrow, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "I would have given them all my money, down to the smallest coin,"

Taking on a look of determination, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "But though they swore and threatened, I would not yield my lady's 
rose.  Did they swear or threaten, still I would not yield my lady's rose."

His voice weary and mournful, barely audible over the mandolin, a grey-eyed 
bard sings, in sirihish:
     "I returned home in darkness, I returned home in pain,"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Walked through the city's clamor, along the dusty street."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Came to my lady's doorstep, and there she bade me in."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "I would not step inside, but flung my flower at her feet."

Glaring at the unseen woman he addresses, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Oh, there's your rose, my lady, I hope you savor its perfume."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "You'll see it's sweetly fair, and opening from the bud."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "And oh, its crimson color, you may think it richly fine,"

Almost snarling as he ends the song, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "But the red upon the petals, it is my own heart's blood.  The red upon its 
petals, it is your true's love blood."



Nakki Whiskey
Addressing the crowd as he begins to play, a grey-eyed bard says, in sirihish:
     "Now the name of this song is Nakki whiskey."

Eyes twinkling, a grey-eyed bard says, in sirihish:
     "We all know it, don't pretend you don't."

A grey-eyed bard bends his head down over the mandolin, letting a
lively song spill from its strings.

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "I went down through Allanak city, Nakki whiskey I chanced to smell."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "I went in, sat down beside her, seven long years I loved her well."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "The more I kissed her the more I loved her, the more I kissed 
her the more she smiled."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Soon I forgot my mother's teaching; Nakki whiskey had me beguiled."

A grey-eyed bard grins over at a table where a drunken dwarf is trying,
not particularly successfully, to clap along with the beat.

Voice rising a little as the crowd sings the chorus with him, a 
grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Whiskey, whiskey, Nakki whiskey, whiskey, whiskey, Nakki O!"

A grey-eyed bard breaks off to take a swallow from the shotglass beside him.

A grey-eyed bard smacks his lips and lets out a long, appreciative breath.

Towards the crowd, a grey-eyed bard asks, in sirihish:
     "Ain't nothing like it, Nakki whiskey.  Wouldn't you agree?"

A grey-eyed bard grins and starts to sing again.

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Now I rose early in the morning, to slake my thirst it was my need."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "I tried to rise but I was not able. Nakki had me by the knees."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "So I'm going back to Tuluki Weaving, I'll surely make them shuttles fly,"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "For I'll make more at Tuluki Weaving than ever I did at the roving way."

The accompanying crowd nearly drowning him out, a grey-eyed bard sings, 
in sirihish:
     "Whiskey, whiskey, Nakki whiskey, whiskey, whiskey, Nakki O!"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "So come all you weavers, you northern Weavers, come all you weavers 
where e'er you be:"

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Beware of whiskey, Nakki whiskey, she'll ruin you like she ruined me."

His voice lost in the general clamor of the crowd as it eagerly shouts out 
the chorus, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Whiskey, whiskey, Nakki whiskey, whiskey, whiskey, Nakki O!"



Erdlu Without No Bone
His voice taking on a slightly nasal, unpleasant quality, a grey-eyed 
bard sings, in sirihish:
     "I gave my love an erdlu without no bone"

A grey-eyed bard ignores the crowd as someone in the back of the room 
audibly groans.

Casting his eyes up piously towards the ceiling, a grey-eyed bard 
sings, in sirihish:
     "I gave my love a kalan without no stone."

A voice from the side of the room shouts out 'Not this old thing!' 
as a grey-eyed bard continues.

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "I gave my love a ring that had no end."

A grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "I gave my love a baby..with nooooooooo crying.'"

A grey-eyed bard pauses, pondering the next verse as the chorus of 
disapproval continues.

Shrugging and continuing, a grey-eyed bard sings, in sirihish:
     "Hooooow can there be an erdlu, without noooo bone?'"

A grey-eyed bard strums on his mandolin.

A fruit flies from the corner, striking a grey-eyed bard.

Looking up and glaring at the crowd, a grey-eyed bard sings, 
in sirihish:
     "Hoooooow can there be a kalan without nooooo stone?"

Another fruit strikes a grey-eyed bard from the side, spattering across 
the stage.

Frowning as he breaks off, a grey-eyed bard says, in sirihish:
     "All right, then, name something you'd rather hear."